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Interaction-Reconciliation

Interaction-Reconciliation

Following the initial success of the band in Australia, ‘Reconciliation’ came together again when Phil Conyngham re-joined Simon O’Dwyer and Maria Cullen O’Dwyer in Europe.  The second band album ‘Interaction’ was recorded in Dublin, Ireland in early 1994.  By this time the threesome were seeking to explore new sound combinations and rhythms which were made possible by the recording and mixing techniques that had emerged around the dance/club industry. ...

Following the initial success of the band in Australia, ‘Reconciliation’ came together again when Phil Conyngham re-joined Simon O’Dwyer and Maria Cullen O’Dwyer in Europe.  The second band album ‘Interaction’ was recorded in Dublin, Ireland in early 1994.  By this time the threesome were seeking to explore new sound combinations and rhythms which were made possible by the recording and mixing techniques that had emerged around the dance/club industry.  The tunes were recorded under the supervision of Rod Callan who had gained expertise in the best ways to capture the sometimes strong frequencies that are a part of ancient instruments.  In some instances individual tracks were taken to London and remixed by master techno engineer Andy Ashford.  The finished product was post mastered by Peter Mew, Abbey Road Studios, London.  ‘Interaction’ in ways relates back to the idea of the concept album which had been so popular in the early 1970s.  Yet, it also breaks new ground expanding the frontiers of musical composition and bringing ancient sounds into a new and vibrant world.

1 Interaction READ MORE 8:48 19.98 MB 0.70 €
2 The Silly Season READ MORE 3:45 8.78 MB 0.70 €
3 The Other Side READ MORE 2:11 5.23 MB 0.70 €
4 Tubby Bop READ MORE 4:34 10.62 MB 0.70 €
5 An Craic (good time) READ MORE 2:37 6.08 MB 0.70 €
6 Psycho Slug READ MORE 3:08 7.7 MB 0.70 €
7 Weightless READ MORE 4:57 11.69 MB 0.70 €
8 Desert Dreaming READ MORE 10:37 24.47 MB 0.70 €
9 The Heater READ MORE 2:49 6.24 MB 0.70 €
     
01  Interaction, 8:48 min
This is the first and title track of the album ‘Interaction’.  The tune is deliberately composed as a long gradually evolving progression.  It is essentially made up of the three main sounds of ‘Reconciliation’, the didgeridoo, the bodhrán and the Irish horns.  The foundation is a loose repeating rhythm which delicately holds the listener without ‘over the top’ domination.  This is perfectly complimented by an even progressing didgeridoo riff whilst bronze horns wash in overall with their ethereal haunting sound.  The whole is very satisfying and as with all good composition it leaves the listener wanting more. Phil Conyngham – bass and treble didgeridoo Maria Cullen O’Dwyer – bodhrán, rhythm egg Simon O’Dwyer – adharc, conch, rhythm egg, hand bodhrán Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
02  The Silly Season, 3:45 min
Part of a new exploration of ancient instruments involved making an elongated mouthpiece end for the dord íseal.  This brought the fundamental tone down to a low G which allowed strange rolling sounds to be played.  The tune imagines two huge ancient creatures getting’ it together’ in ‘The Silly Season.’  The World trembles as they cautiously get closer until all is well when they call together in the end. Phil Conyngham –  didgeridoo Simon O’Dwyer –, dord íseal, conch, click stones Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
03  The Other Side, 2:11 min
This duet of didgeridoo and bodhrán is one of the signature tunes of ‘Reconciliation’.  It is a follow up from a track on the earlier album ‘Two Stories in One’ (see track 3 ‘Over the Road’ – ‘Two Stories in One’ album). The driving 4/4 rhythm played by hand bodhrán superbly combines with intricate didgeridoo playing to create a rocking tune.  The combination sounds so much more complicated with the sum of its two parts. Phil Conyngham –  didgeridoo Simon O’Dwyer – hand bodhrán Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
04  Tubby Bop, 4:34 min
Maria Cullen O’Dwyer had taken an interest in the distinctive Irish frame drum, the hand bodhrán.  Her teacher Robbie Walsh was of a new breed of bodhrán players who was actively exploring fresh progressive styles.  Thus, Maria’s playing was stronger, with more tone being achieved through the use of a particularly heavy two ended stick.  As she progressed within ‘Reconciliation’, so a new exciting percussion was created which for the first time took the  bodhrán out of the Irish traditional music discipline and into more mainstream drumming.  ‘Tubby Bop’ employs the uniquely Irish sideways playing action of the bodhrán and tubby drum with the studio mixing of the dance techno world.  The result could well be taken as African tribal drumming yet it must be remembered that all the beats on ‘Tubby Bop’ are played in the swinging sideways Irish style. Maria Cullen O’Dwyer -  bodhrán, tubby drum Phil Conyngham – clap sticks Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Andy Ashford – further mixing and mastering, South London, England, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
05  An Craic (good time), 2:37 min
Irish bronze horns work very well together in large numbers.  By using overtracking it is possible to build up layers which can come together to make a big band type of sound.  There is no reason why large numbers of horns shouldn’t have been played together in ancient times.  The largest ever find of prehistoric metal instruments was a hoard of 26 Bronze Age horns and 39 crotals that turned up during ploughing near Birr, Co. Offally, Ireland in the mid-19th Century AD.  This tune ‘An Craic’ is rich and vibrant whilst the simple melody is created through horns alternating with each other. Simon O’Dwyer – dord íseal,dord ard, adharc, conch shell, boomerang sticks. Phil Conyngham – clap sticks Maria Cullen O’Dwyer – clap sticks Rod Callan – clap sticks Paul Ashe Browne – clap sticks Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
06  Psycho Slug, 3:08 min
This studio recording of a didgeridoo tune became the basis for Phil Conyngham’s solo performances in later gigs.   (also see track 08 ‘Live 1’ album).  It would appear that as he works through the remarkable rhythm and tone progression of the tune Phil is imagining a perverted slug sliming his way through his perverted day.  This has to be one of the more unusual examples of a theme for a tune! Phil Conyngham – didgeridoo Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
07  Weightless, 4:57 min
‘Weightless’ was composed as a therapeutic relaxing sound during which the listener might drift, forgetting staccato or bustle whilst allowing subtle harmonics to gently move through.  To achieve this the band imagined the sensation of floating in liquid in a completely weightless state.  All one has to do is relax and let the waves move along easy. Phil Conyngham – didgeridoo, singing bowl Maria Cullen O’Dwyer – Tibetan prayer bells Simon O’Dwyer – dord íseal, singing bowl, sejel flute Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
08  Desert Dreaming, 10:37 min
On a Sunday during the weeks of recording for ‘Interaction’ while the other band members were taking a day off, Phil Conyngham recorded a multi-track tune using all the instruments from the band.  He then brought the multi tapes to his friend and musical collaborator, Andy Ashford.  Andy had forged a name for himself in the South London techno scene of the time.  Desert Dreaming is a fascinating combination of instrumentation and empty space.  The listener can imagine great rolling vistas of desert while the silence is occasionally broken by the rush of an insect or the rattle of a lizard.  This tune could only have been composed by someone who had lots of experience of the Australian desert. Phil Conyngham – didgeridoo, dord íseal,dord ard, adharc, bodhrán, boomerang sticks, clap sticks. Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Andy Ashford – further mixing and mastering, South London, England, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994
09  The Heater, 2:49 min
The Heater is a studio recorded version of a mad idea originally instigated by Alan Dargin in the early days of the band ‘Reconciliation’.  (also see track 9, ‘Live 1’ album).  The idea was to begin with a relaxed tempo and then gradually accelerate faster and faster until the effect is as if the tune takes off and flies.  To achieve the required speed for this was quite difficult for everyone except Alan who was so fast that he would deliberately hold back so as not to leave the rest behind. Phil Conyngham - didgeridoo Maria Cullen O’Dwyer – bodhrán Simon O’Dwyer – dord iseal Rod Callan – engineering and mastering, The Works Studios, Dublin, Ireland, 1994 Peter Mew – post mastering, Abbey Road Studios, London, England, 1994

 
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